Projects

Reporting projects from Pulitzer Center grantees

Displaying 1–12 of 790
October 23, 2017

People of the Kelp

Saul Elbein, Jim McAuley

Up Canada's West Coast in search of the world's biggest unreported land conflicted.

October 13, 2017

What Is Left for Venezuelans?

Lila Franco

Venezuela is facing its biggest crisis yet: a high inflation rate, shortage of food and medicine, and abuse of power by authorities. And that's only part of the picture.

October 12, 2017

Climate Change and Sheepherding in Algeria

Yasmin Bendaas

Although Algeria is a low emitter of greenhouse gasses, environmental changes like lower rainfall, higher temperatures, and longer cycles of drought have slashed profits for Algerian sheepherders.

October 11, 2017

Iran Takes Charge in Iraq

Reza Sayah, Gelareh Kiazand

In a multi-part series for PBS NewsHour , Reza Sayah and Gelareh Kiazand look at Iran’s influence in its war-torn neighbor.

October 06, 2017

Catholic Sex Abuse on Guam

Anita Hofschneider, Cory Lum

Guam is reeling from nearly 100 lawsuits alleging sexual abuse by various Catholic priests, including the archbishop. Why has it taken so long for these accusations to surface?

October 05, 2017

Europe Slams Its Gates

Ty McCormick, Cameron Abadi, Peter Tinti, Nichole Sobecki, Jill Filipovic

A series on Europe’s controversial "pay-to-stay" effort to fight migration at its source.

September 26, 2017

A New Era in Cuban Migration

José Antonio Iglesias, Mario J. Pentón, Luis Trelles

The Obama administration’s decision to end the "wet foot, dry foot" policy has created a migration and humanitarian crisis in Central and South America and a new era in Cuban migration.

September 26, 2017

'Treasonous' Young Kurds and a Referendum

Kenneth R. Rosen

Iraqi Kurdistan wants to split from Iraq's central government. But a group of young Kurds have joined controversial Baghdad-backed militias of Iraq. They provide a unique window on where the country may be heading.

September 25, 2017

Iceland: Ethical Challenges of Genetic Testing

Anna Marsibil Clausen

Genetic scientists in Iceland want to warn 2,400 people who are more likely than others to develop breast cancer, but they can't. The individuals have the right not to know.